Journal Highlight: Implementation of proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for advanced bioprocess monitoring

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  • Published: Dec 10, 2012
  • Author: spectroscopyNOW
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thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Implementation of proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for advanced bioprocess monitoring

Implementation of proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for advanced bioprocess monitoring

Biotechnology and Bioengineering, 2012, 109, 3059-3069
Markus Luchner, Rene Gutmann, Karl Bayer, Jürgen Dunkl, Armin Hansel, Jens Herbig, Wolfgang Singer, Florian Strobl, Klaus Winkler, Gerald Striedner

The implementation of PTR-MS technology for on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds in the off-gas of bioreactors is described, including the development of an interface between the bioreactor and an analyzer for continuous sampling.

Abstract: We report on the implementation of proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) technology for on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the off-gas of bioreactors. The main part of the work was focused on the development of an interface between the bioreactor and an analyzer suitable for continuous sampling of VOCs emanating from the bioprocess. The permanently heated sampling line with an inert surface avoids condensation and interaction of volatiles during transfer to the PTR-MS. The interface is equipped with a sterile sinter filter unit directly connected to the bioreactor headspace, a condensate trap, and a series of valves allowing for dilution of the headspace gas, in-process calibration, and multiport operation. To assess the aptitude of the entire system, a case study was conducted comprising three identical cultivations with a recombinant E. coli strain, and the volatiles produced in the course of the experiments were monitored with the PTR-MS. The high reproducibility of the measurements proved that the established sampling interface allows for reproducible transfer of volatiles from the headspace to the PTR-MS analyzer. The set of volatile compounds monitored comprises metabolites of different pathways with diverse functions in cell physiology but also volatiles from the process matrix. The trends of individual compounds showed diverse patterns. The recorded signal levels covered a dynamic range of more than five orders of magnitude. It was possible to assign specific volatile compounds to distinctive events in the bioprocess. The presented results clearly show that PTR-MS was successfully implemented as a powerful bioprocess-monitoring tool and that access to volatiles emitted by the cells opens promising perspectives in terms of advanced process control.

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