Journal Highlight: Comparison of direct mass spectrometry methods for the on-line analysis of volatile compounds in foods

Skip to Navigation

Ezine

  • Published: Jun 10, 2013
  • Author: spectroscopyNOW
  • Channels: Base Peak
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Comparison of direct mass spectrometry methods for the on-line analysis of volatile compounds in foods
This study highlighted the equivalent performances of APCI-MS and PTR-MS for in vitro and in vivo flavour release investigations and provided useful data on the problematic use of sample bags for headspace analyses.

Comparison of direct mass spectrometry methods for the on-line analysis of volatile compounds in foods

Journal of Mass Spectrometry, 2013, 48, 594-607
Isabelle Déléris, Anne Saint-Eve, Etienne Sémon, Hervé Guillemin, Elisabeth Guichard, Isabelle Souchon, Jean-Luc Le Quéré

Abstract: For the on-line monitoring of flavour compound release, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and proton transfer reaction (PTR) combined to mass spectrometry (MS) are the most often used ionization technologies. APCI-MS was questioned for the quantification of volatiles in complex mixtures, but direct comparisons of APCI and PTR techniques applied on the same samples remain scarce. The aim of this work was to compare the potentialities of both techniques for the study of in vitro and in vivo flavour release. Aroma release from flavoured aqueous solutions (in vitro measurements in Teflon bags and glass vials) or flavoured candies (in vivo measurements on six panellists) was studied using APCI- and PTR-MS. Very similar results were obtained with both techniques. Their sensitivities, expressed as limit of detection of 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, were found equivalent at 12 ng/l air. Analyses of Teflon bag headspace revealed a poor repeatability and important ionization competitions with both APCI- and PTR-MS, particularly between an ester and a secondary alcohol. These phenomena were attributed to dependency on moisture content, gas/liquid volume ratio, proton affinities and product ion distribution, together with inherent drawbacks of Teflon bags (adsorption, condensation of water and polar molecules). Concerning the analyses of vial headspace and in vivo analyses, similar results were obtained with both techniques, revealing no competition phenomena. This study highlighted the equivalent performances of APCI-MS and PTR-MS for in vitro and in vivo flavour release investigations and provided useful data on the problematic use of sample bags for headspace analyses.

  • This paper is free to view for all users registered on spectroscopyNOW.com until the end of July 2013.
    After this time, you can purchase it using Pay-Per-View on Wiley Online Library.

Social Links

Share This Links

Bookmark and Share

Microsites

Suppliers Selection
Societies Selection

Banner Ad

Click here to see
all job opportunities

Most Viewed

Copyright Information

Interested in separation science? Visit our sister site separationsNOW.com

Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved