Journal Highlight: Neural correlates of stress and favorite-food cue exposure in adolescents: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

Skip to Navigation

Ezine

  • Published: Nov 25, 2013
  • Author: spectroscopyNOW
  • Channels: MRI Spectroscopy
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Neural correlates of stress and favorite-food cue exposure in adolescents: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study
Brain activation patterns in adolescents were examined during stress and favorite-food-cue experiences relative to a neutral-relaxing condition.

Neural correlates of stress and favorite-food cue exposure in adolescents: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

Human Brain Mapping, 2013, 34, 2561–2573
Rebecca E. Hommer, Dongju Seo, Cheryl M. Lacadie, Tara M. Chaplin, Linda C. Mayes, Rajita Sinha, Marc N. Potenza

Abstract: Adolescence is a critical period of neurodevelopment for stress and appetitive processing, as well as a time of increased vulnerability to stress and engagement in risky behaviors. This study was conducted to examine brain activation patterns during stress and favorite-food-cue experiences relative to a neutral-relaxing condition in adolescents. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was employed using individualized script-driven guided imagery to compare brain responses with such experiences in 43 adolescents. Main effects of condition and gender were found, without a significant gender-by-condition interaction. Stress imagery, relative to neutral, was associated with activation in the caudate, thalamus, left hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus, midbrain, left superior/middle temporal gyrus, and right posterior cerebellum. Appetitive imagery of favorite food was associated with caudate, thalamus, and midbrain activation compared with the neutral-relaxing condition. To understand neural correlates of anxiety and craving, subjective (self-reported) measures of stress-induced anxiety and favorite-food-cue-induced craving were correlated with brain activity during stress and appetitive food-cue conditions, respectively. High self-reported stress-induced anxiety was associated with hypoactivity in the striatum, thalamus, hippocampus, and midbrain. Self-reported favorite-food-cue-induced craving was associated with blunted activity in cortical-striatal regions, including the right dorsal and ventral striatum, medial prefrontal cortex, motor cortex, and left anterior cingulate cortex. These findings in adolescents indicate the activation of predominantly subcortical-striatal regions in the processing of stressful and appetitive experiences and link hypoactive striatal circuits to self-reported stress-induced anxiety and cue-induced favorite-food craving.

  • This paper is free to view for all users registered on spectroscopyNOW.com until the end of December 2013.
    After this time, you can purchase it using Pay-Per-View on Wiley Online Library.

Social Links

Share This Links

Bookmark and Share

Microsites

Suppliers Selection
Societies Selection

Banner Ad

Click here to see
all job opportunities

Most Viewed

Copyright Information

Interested in separation science? Visit our sister site separationsNOW.com

Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved