Journal Highlight: Kinetics and mechanism studies on dispersion of CNT in SDS aqueous solutions

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  • Published: May 12, 2014
  • Author: spectroscopyNOW
  • Channels: UV/Vis Spectroscopy
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Kinetics and mechanism studies on dispersion of CNT in SDS aqueous solutions
The kinetics and mechanism of the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in sodium dodecyl sulfate aqueous solutions were studied by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy.

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Kinetics and mechanism studies on dispersion of CNT in SDS aqueous solutions

Journal of the Chinese Chemical Society, 2014, 61, 481-489
Jung-Hui Chen

Abstract: The objects of this research are to study the dispersion of CNT (carbon nanotube) in SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) aqueous solutions with kinetics approach and to obtain some information about mechanism for this dispersion. Firstly, I measured the UV-visible absorption at 260 nm of CNT in SDS aqueous solutions after different time of dispersion for different concentrations of CNT and SDS. Then, curves of the time-dependent absorbance were analyzed by various mathematical models and were found to fit well with equation of A = A∞ exp(-kobs t), where A∞ is the absorbance at infinite time and kobs is the observed rate constant. The values of A∞, kobs, and minimum time for dispersion can be obtained. From the effects of concentrations of SDS and CNT on A∞ and kobs, the dissociation constant for CNT-SDS complex and the optimum ratio of [CNT]/[SDS] can be estimated. Finally, the mechanism for the dispersion of bound CNT to the CNT-SDS complex via exfoliated CNT is proposed. In this mechanism, b-CNT is firstly unbounded by supersonic energy to form CNT intermediate with rate constant of k1, which is proportional to the supersonic energy per time. The CNT intermediate then recombines to form b-CNT with rate constant k−1[CNT] or reacts with SDS to form CNT-SDS complex, which has absorbance at 260 nm in UV-visible spectrum, with rate constant of k2[SDS]. Details of kinetics and mechanism will be discussed in this paper.

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