Journal Highlight: Optimized ultrasound-assisted emulsification-microextraction followed by ICP-OES for simultaneous determination of ytterbium and holmium in natural water

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  • Published: Sep 1, 2014
  • Author: spectroscopyNOW
  • Channels: Atomic
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Optimized ultrasound-assisted emulsification-microextraction followed by ICP-OES for simultaneous determination of ytterbium and holmium in natural water
Ultrasound-assisted emulsification-microextraction followed by ICP-OES was used for the simultaneous extraction and determination of holmium and ytterbium ions in water with 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol as a chelating agent.


Optimized ultrasound-assisted emulsification-microextraction followed by ICP-OES for simultaneous determination of ytterbium and holmium in natural water

CLEAN – Soil, Air, Water, 2014, 42, 1089-1097
Hassan Sereshti, Mansoure Kermani, Maryam Karimi and Soheila Samadi

Abstract: In this study, the optimized ultrasound-assisted emulsification-microextraction followed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry was applied to simultaneous extraction and determination of holmium (Ho3+) and ytterbium (Yb3+) in water samples. 1-(2-Pyridylazo)-2-naphthol was used as chelating agent to form extractable complexes. Volume of extraction solvent, concentration of chelating agent, pH, ultrasonic time, temperature, and concentration of salt were considered as the variables of the method. To evaluate the results, extraction recovery was selected as the response. Significance of the variables was investigated by using a half-fraction factorial design (2f−1) and the optimization was performed by applying a central composite design. The calibration graphs were linear in the range of 4–200 µg L−1 for Ho3+ and 3–500 µg L−1 for Yb3+ with determination coefficients (R2) of 0.988 and 0.997 for Ho3+ and Yb3+, respectively. Limit of detection was 0.364 µg L−1 for Ho3+ and 0.252 µg L−1 for Yb3+. The relative standard deviations (C = 200 µg L−1, n = 6) were in the range of 4.2–4.5%. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of real water samples with the recoveries in the range of 80–95%.

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