Journal Highlight: Exotic X-ray back-diffraction: a path toward a soft inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometer

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  • Published: Nov 10, 2014
  • Author: spectroscopyNOW
  • Channels: X-ray Spectrometry
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Exotic X-ray back-diffraction: a path toward a soft inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometer
Soft X-ray back-diffraction, at angles near and exactly equal to 90°, has been explored with a novel high-resolution Si(220) multi-bounce back-diffraction monochromator and an ultra-thin Si(220) crystal as the sample.



Exotic X-ray back-diffraction: a path toward a soft inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometer

Journal of Applied Crystallography, 2014, 47, 1658-1665
Marcelo Goncalves Hönnicke, Raymond Conley, Cesar Cusatis, Edson Massayuki Kakuno, Juan Zhou, Nathalie Bouet, Joao Basso Marques and Flavio Cesar Vicentin

Abstract: In this work, soft X-ray back-diffraction (XBD; X-ray diffraction at angles near and exactly equal to 90°) is explored. The experiment was conducted at the SXS beamline at Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, Brazil, at ∼3.2 keV. A high-resolution Si(220) multi-bounce back-diffraction monochromator was designed and constructed for this experiment. An ultra-thin Si(220) crystal (5 µm thick) was used as the sample. This ultra-thin crystal was characterized by profilometry, rocking-curve measurements and X-ray topography prior to the XBD measurements. It is shown that the measured forward-diffracted beam (o-beam) profiles, taken at different temperatures, are in close agreement with profiles predicted by the extended dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction, with the absence of multiple-beam diffraction (MBD). This is an important result for future studies on the basic properties of back-diffracted X-ray beams at energies slightly above the exact XBD condition (extreme condition where XBD is almost extinguished). Also, the results presented here indicate that stressed crystals behave like ideal strain-free crystals when used for low-energy XBD. This is mainly due to the large widths of XBD profiles, which lead to a low strain sensitivity in the detection of defects. This result opens up new possibilities for mounting spherical analyzers without degrading the energy resolution, at least for low energies. This is a path that may be used to construct a soft inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometer where different applications such as element-specific magnetic imaging tools could be explored.

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