Journal Highlight: Relationship between cardiac function and resting cerebral blood flow: MRI measurements in healthy elderly subjects

Skip to Navigation

Ezine

  • Published: Nov 24, 2014
  • Author: spectroscopyNOW
  • Channels: MRI Spectroscopy
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Relationship between cardiac function and resting cerebral blood flow: MRI measurements in healthy elderly subjects
The potential effects of cardiac function on cerebral blood flow in elderly patients were studied by MRI imaging techniques, showing that fractional brain flow is a novel index for adequate brain perfusion as well as cardiovascular disease.



Relationship between cardiac function and resting cerebral blood flow: MRI measurements in healthy elderly subjects

Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, 2014, 34, 471-477
Otto M. Henriksen, Lars T. Jensen, Katja Krabbe, Henrik B. W. Larsson and Egill Rostrup

Abstract: Although both impaired cardiac function and reduced cerebral blood flow are associated with ageing, current knowledge of the influence of cardiac function on resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects of cardiac function on CBF. CBF and cardiac output were measured in 31 healthy subjects 50–75 years old using magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Mean values of CBF, cardiac output and cardiac index were 43·6 ml per 100 g min−1, 5·5 l min−1 and 2·7 l min−1 m−2, respectively, in males, and 53·4 ml per 100 g min−1, 4·3 l min−1 and 2·4 l min−1 m−2, respectively, in females. No effects of cardiac output or cardiac index on CBF or structural signs of brain ageing were observed. However, fractional brain flow defined as the ratio of total brain flow to cardiac output was inversely correlated with cardiac index (r2 = 0·22, P = 0·008) and furthermore lower in males than in females (8·6% versus 12·5%, P = 0·003). Fractional brain flow was also inversely correlated with cerebral white matter lesion grade, although this effect was not significant when adjusted for age. Frequency analysis of heart rate variability showed a gender-related inverse association of increased low-to-high-frequency power ratio with CBF and fractional brain flow. The findings do not support a direct effect of cardiac function on CBF, but demonstrates gender-related differences in cardiac output distribution. We propose fractional brain flow as a novel index that may be a useful marker of adequate brain perfusion in the context of ageing as well as cardiovascular disease.

  • This paper is free to view for all users registered on spectroscopyNOW.com until the end of December 2014.
    After this time, you can purchase it using Pay-Per-View on Wiley Online Library.

Social Links

Share This Links

Bookmark and Share

Microsites

Suppliers Selection
Societies Selection

Banner Ad

Click here to see
all job opportunities

Most Viewed

Copyright Information

Interested in separation science? Visit our sister site separationsNOW.com

Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved