Journal Highlight: On the tuning of high-resolution NMR probes

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  • Published: Dec 1, 2014
  • Author: spectroscopyNOW
  • Channels: NMR Knowledge Base
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: On the tuning of high-resolution NMR probes
Three optimum conditions for the tuning of NMR probes are compared: the conventional tuning optimum, the spin noise tuning optimum and the newly introduced frequency shift tuning optimum.

On the tuning of high-resolution NMR probes

ChemPhysChem, 2014, 15, 3639-3645
Maria Theresia Pöschko, Judith Schlagnitweit, Gaspard Huber, Martin Nausner, Michaela Horničáková, Hervé Desvaux and Norbert Müller

Abstract: Three optimum conditions for the tuning of NMR probes are compared: the conventional tuning optimum, which is based on radio-frequency pulse efficiency, the spin noise tuning optimum based on the line shape of the spin noise signal, and the newly introduced frequency shift tuning optimum, which minimizes the frequency pushing effect on strong signals. The latter results if the radiation damping feedback field is not in perfect quadrature to the precessing magnetization. According to the conventional RLC (resistor–inductor–capacitor) resonant circuit model, the optima should be identical, but significant deviations are found experimentally at low temperatures, in particular on cryogenically cooled probes. The existence of different optima with respect to frequency pushing and spin noise line shape has important consequences on the nonlinearity of spin dynamics at high polarization levels and the implementation of experiments on cold probes.

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