Journal Highlight: Effects of fungal species, cultivation time, growth substrate, and air exposure velocity on the fluorescence properties of airborne fungal spores

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  • Published: Dec 7, 2015
  • Author: spectroscopyNOW
  • Channels: UV/Vis Spectroscopy
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Effects of fungal species, cultivation time, growth substrate, and air exposure velocity on the fluorescence properties of airborne fungal spores
The major factors that affect the fluorescence properties of airborne fungal spores of three species have been studied using fluorescence-based bioaerosol detectors, the results being useful for field measurements and lab studies.

Effects of fungal species, cultivation time, growth substrate, and air exposure velocity on the fluorescence properties of airborne fungal spores

Indoor Air, 2015, 25, 653-661
S. Saari, J. Mensah-Attipoe, T. Reponen, A. M. Veijalainen, A. Salmela, P. Pasanen and J. Keskinen

Abstract: Real-time bioaerosol monitoring is possible with fluorescence based instruments. This study provides information on major factors that can affect the fluorescence properties of airborne fungal spores. Two fluorescence-based bioaerosol detectors, BioScout, and ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS), were used to study fluorescent particle fractions (FPFs) of released spores of three fungal species (Aspergillus versicolor, Cladosporium cladosporioides, and Penicillium brevicompactum). Two culture media (agar and gypsum board), three ages of the culture (one week, one month, and four months), and three aerosolization air velocities (5, 15, and 27 m/s) were tested. The results showed that the FPF values for spores released from gypsum were typically lower than for those released from agar indicating that poor nutrient substrate produces spores with lower amounts of fluorescent compounds. The results also showed higher FPF values with lower air velocities in aerosolization. This indicates that easily released fully developed spores have more fluorescent compounds compared to forcibly extracted non-matured spores. The FPFs typically were lower with older samples. The FPF results between the two instruments were similar, except with four-month-old samples. The results can be utilized in field measurements of fungal spores to estimate actual concentrations and compare different instruments with fluorescence-based devices as well as in instrument calibration and testing in laboratory conditions.

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