Journal Highlight: Authenticity of rice (Oryza sativa L.) geographical origin based on analysis of C, N, O and S stable isotope ratios: a preliminary case report in Korea, China and Philippine

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  • Published: Jun 13, 2016
  • Author: spectroscopyNOW
  • Channels: Chemometrics & Informatics
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Authenticity of rice (<em>Oryza sativa</em> L.) geographical origin based on analysis of C, N, O and S stable isotope ratios: a preliminary case report in Korea, China and Philippine
Analysis of the light element isotope composition of rices combined with chemometrics can be used to discriminate the geographical origin of rice and may also help to identify improper or fraudulent labeling of rice worldwide.

Authenticity of rice (Oryza sativa L.) geographical origin based on analysis of C, N, O and S stable isotope ratios: a preliminary case report in Korea, China and Philippine

Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 2016, 96, 2433-2439
Ill-Min Chung, Jae-Kwang Kim, Mayakrishnan Prabakaran, Jin-Hee Yang and Seung-Hyun Kim

Abstract: Although rice (Oryza sativa L.) is the third largest food crop, relatively fewer studies have been reported on rice geographical origin based on light element isotope ratios in comparison with other foods such as wine, beef, juice, oil and milk. Therefore this study tries to discriminate the geographical origin of the same rice cultivars grown in different Asian countries using the analysis of C, N, O and S stable isotope ratios and chemometrics. The δ15NAIR, δ18OVSMOW and δ34SVCDT values of brown rice were more markedly influenced by geographical origin than was the δ13CVPDB value. In particular, the combination of δ18OVSMOW and δ34SVCDT more efficiently discriminated rice geographical origin than did the remaining combinations. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed a clear discrimination between different rice geographical origins but not between rice genotypes. In particular, the first components of PCA discriminated rice cultivated in the Philippines from rice cultivated in China and Korea. The present findings suggest that analysis of the light element isotope composition combined with chemometrics can be potentially applicable to discriminate rice geographical origin and also may provide a valuable insight into the control of improper or fraudulent labeling regarding the geographical origin of rice worldwide.

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