Journal Highlight: Alzheimer disease classification using KPCA, LDA, and multi-kernel learning SVM

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  • Published: Jun 12, 2017
  • Author: spectroscopyNOW
  • Channels: Chemometrics & Informatics
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Alzheimer disease classification using KPCA, LDA, and multi-kernel learning SVM

A novel diagnosis method for distinguishing Alzheimer disease, mild cognitive impairment and healthy states used kernel PCA followed by LDA and a a multi-kernel SVM for training and testing for detection.

Alzheimer disease classification using KPCA, LDA, and multi-kernel learning SVM

International Journal of Imaging Systems and Technology, 2017, 27, 133-143
Saruar Alam, Goo-Rak Kwon and The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

Abstract: Early diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is always useful. Preventive measures might have an impact on reducing AD risk factors. Structural magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, one of the vital sensitive biomarkers for cerebral atrophy in the brain, is used to extract volumetric feature by FreeSurfer and the CIVET toolbox. All of the structural magnetic resonance imaging (s-MRI) data that we used were downloaded from the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database (adni.loni.usc.edu) of imaging data. This novel approach is applied for the diagnosis of AD and MCI from healthy controls (HCs) combining extracted features with the MMSE (mini-mental state examination) scores, applying a two sample t-test to select a subset of features. The subset of features is fed to kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) module to project data onto the reduced principal component coefficients at higher dimensional kernel space to increase the linear separability. Then, the kernel PCA coefficients are projected into the more efficient linear discriminant space using linear discriminant analysis. A multi-kernel learning support vector machine (SVM) is used on newly projected data for stratification of AD and MCI from HCs. Using this approach, we obtain 93.85% classification accuracy when detecting AD from HCs for segmented volumetric features (using FreeSurfer) with high sensitivity and specificity. When distinguishing MCI from HCs and AD using volumetric features after subcortical segmentation, the detection rate reaches 86.54% and 75.12%, respectively.

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