Journal Highlight: Lipoprotein particle concentration measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is associated with gestational age at delivery: a prospective cohort study

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  • Published: Oct 2, 2017
  • Author: spectroscopyNOW
  • Channels: NMR Knowledge Base
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Lipoprotein particle concentration measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is associated with gestational age at delivery: a prospective cohort study

The complex relationship between maternal lipoproteins and preterm birth has been studied using NMR to measure lipoprotein particle levels in the blood of women at 24-29 weeks gestation.

Lipoprotein particle concentration measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is associated with gestational age at delivery: a prospective cohort study

BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 2017, online
Matthew R. Grace, Catherine J. Vladutiu, Rachel C. Nethery, Anna Maria Siega-Riz, Tracy A. Manuck, Amy H. Herring, David Savitz and John T. Thorp

Abstract: The association between lipoprotein particle concentrations in pregnancy and gestational age at delivery was estimated by NMR after collecting blood from 715 women enrolled in the Pregnancy, Infection, and Nutrition study from 2001-2005. Fasting blood was collected at two time points (<20 weeks and 24-29 weeks gestation). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantified lipoprotein particle concentrations (low-density lipoprotein [LDL], high-density lipoprotein [HDL], very-low density lipoprotein [VLDL]) and 10 subclasses of lipoproteins. Concentrations were assessed as continuous measures, with the exception of medium HDL which was classified as any or no detectable level, given its distribution. Cox proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios (HR) for gestational age at delivery adjusting for covariates. At <20 weeks, three lipoproteins were associated with later gestational ages at delivery, (large LDLNMR (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.64, 0.96) total VLDLNMR (HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.61, 0.98), and small VLDLNMR (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.62, 0.98), while large VLDLNMR (HR 1.19, 95% CI 1.01, 1.41) was associated with a greater hazard of earlier delivery. At 24-28 weeks, average VLDLNMR (HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.03, 1.51) and a detectable level of medium HDLNMR (HR 1.90, 95% CI 1.19, 3.02) were associated with earlier gestational ages at delivery. In this sample of pregnant women, particle concentrations of VLDLNMR, LDLNMR, IDLNMR, and HDLNMR were each independently associated with gestational age at delivery for all deliveries or spontaneous deliveries <37 weeks. These findings may help formulate hypotheses for future studies of the complex relationship between maternal lipoproteins and preterm birth.

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