Journal Highlight: Interrogation of spatial metabolome of Ginkgo biloba with high‐resolution MALDI and LDI mass spectrometry imaging

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  • Published: Aug 6, 2018
  • Author: spectroscopyNOW
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thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Interrogation of spatial metabolome of <em>Ginkgo biloba</em> with high‐resolution MALDI and LDI mass spectrometry imaging

Mass spectrometry imaging has been used to interrogate the spatio‐chemical localization of metabolites across the ginkgo leaf using MALDI and LDI FTICR MS.

Image: NIEHS / NIH.

Interrogation of spatial metabolome of Ginkgo biloba with high‐resolution MALDI and LDI mass spectrometry imaging

Plant, Cell & Environment, 2018, online
Bin Li, Elizabeth K. Neumann, Junyue Ge, Wen Gao, Hua Yang, Ping Li, Jonathan V. Sweedler

Abstract: Ginkgo biloba is one of the oldest extant seed plants and has a number of unique properties and uses. Numerous efforts have characterized metabolites within the ginkgo plant and their corresponding biosynthesis pathways, but spatio‐chemical information on ginkgo metabolites is lacking. Mass spectrometry (MS) imaging was used to interrogate the spatio‐chemical localization of metabolites with matrix‐assisted laser desorption/ionization and laser desorption/ionization Fourier‐transform ion cyclotron resonance (MALDI and LDI FT‐ICR) MS across the ginkgo leaf. Flavonoids, particularly unexpected and rare flavonoid cyclodimers, were detected predominately from leaf epidermis; ginkgolic acids and cardanols were observed exclusively in the secretory cavities. A non‐uniform distribution of flavonoids observed between the upper and lower leaf epidermis was verified by LC‐MS analyses. Other metabolites, such as saccharides, phospholipids, and chlorophylls, occurred mainly in mesophyll cells. Furthermore, organ‐ and tissue‐specific distribution of ginkgolides were revealed in the ginkgo root, young stem and leaf. The acquired ion images provide important information regarding biosynthesis, transportation, and accumulation of metabolites throughout the ginkgo plant, and should help us to understand the physiological roles of several plant secondary metabolites.

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