Journal Highlight: Effects of hypnotics on prefrontal cortex activity during a verbal fluency task in healthy male subjects: A near‐infrared spectroscopy study

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  • Published: Nov 26, 2018
  • Author: spectroscopyNOW
  • Channels: Infrared Spectroscopy
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Effects of hypnotics on prefrontal cortex activity during a verbal fluency task in healthy male subjects: A near‐infrared spectroscopy study

The effects of hypnotics on prefrontal cortex activity in healthy subjects have been assessed using near‐infrared spectroscopy in a double‐blind, placebo‐controlled crossover trial.

Effects of hypnotics on prefrontal cortex activity during a verbal fluency task in healthy male subjects: A near‐infrared spectroscopy study

Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental, 2018, 33, e2678 online
Yoshiyuki Tsuruta, Kunihiro Iwamoto, Masahiro Banno, Naoko Kawano, Kunihiro Kohmura, Seiko Miyata, Hiroshige Fujishiro, Yukihiro Noda, Akiko Noda, Shuji Iritani, Norio Ozaki

Abstract: The effects of hypnotics on prefrontal cortex activity in healthy subjects have been assessed using near‐infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in a double‐blind, placebo‐controlled crossover trial. Eighteen healthy males received acute doses of ramelteon (8 mg), triazolam (0.125 mg), or placebo in a predetermined randomization schedule, with a washout period of more than 1 week. All subjects performed a verbal fluency task during NIRS assessments at baseline and at 1 and 4 hr post‐dose. The number of words correctly generated during the task (behavioral performance) and scores on the Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS) were also recorded at each test time. Compared with the placebo, triazolam (0.125 mg) significantly decreased oxyhemoglobin (oxy‐Hb) concentration change in NIRS during the posttask period and significantly increased behavioral performance, whereas triazolam (0.125 mg) and ramelteon (8 mg) significantly increased SSS scores. The differential effects of two types of hypnotics on oxy‐Hb change measured by NIRS were observed in acute dosing, suggesting that when assessing brain activity of patients with psychiatric disorders, researchers should consider how certain types of hypnotics can influence brain function. This would also provide useful information to clinicians when prescribing hypnotics suitable for their patients' conditions.

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