The use of in vitro technologies coupled with high resolution accurate mass LC-MS for studying drug metabolism in equine drug research

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  • Published: Apr 12, 2010
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thumbnail image: The use of <em>in vitro</em> technologies coupled with high resolution accurate mass LC-MS for studying drug metabolism in equine drug research

The use of in vitro technologies coupled with high resolution accurate mass LC-MS for studying drug metabolism in equine drug research

Drug Testing and Analysis 2010, 2, 1-10
James P. Scarth, Holly A. Spencer, Sarah E. Timbers, Simon C. Hudson, Lynn L. Hillyer

Abstract: The detection of drug abuse in horseracing often requires knowledge of drug metabolism, especially if urine is the matrix of choice. In this study, equine liver/lung microsomes/S9 tissue fractions were used to study the phase I metabolism of eight drugs of relevance to equine drug surveillance (acepromazine, azaperone, celecoxib, fentanyl, fluphenazine, mepivacaine, methylphenidate and tripelennamine). In vitro samples were analyzed qualitatively alongside samples originating from in vivo administrations using LC-MS on a high resolution accurate mass Thermo Orbitrap Discovery instrument and by LC-MS/MS on an Applied Biosystems Sciex 5500 Q Trap. Using high resolution accurate mass full-scan analysis on the Orbitrap, the in vitro systems were found to generate at least the two most abundant phase I metabolites observed in vitro for all eight drugs studied. In the majority of cases, in vitro experiments were also able to generate the minor in vivo metabolites and sometimes metabolites that were only observed in vitro. More detailed analyses of fentanyl incubates using LC-MS/MS showed that it was possible to generate good quality spectra from the metabolites generated in vitro. These data support the suggestion of using in vitro incubates as metabolite reference material in place of in vivo post-administration samples in accordance with new qualitative identification guidelines in the 2009 International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation-G7 (ILAC-G7) document. In summary, the in vitro and in vivo phase I metabolism results reported herein compare well and demonstrate the potential of in vitro studies to compliment, refine and reduce the existing equine in vivo paradigm.

horserace

 

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