Journal Highlight: Examining the phonological neighborhood density effect using near infrared spectroscopy

Skip to Navigation

Ezine

  • Published: Sep 6, 2011
  • Channels: Infrared Spectroscopy
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Examining the phonological neighborhood density effect using near infrared spectroscopy

Examining the phonological neighborhood density effect using near infrared spectroscopy

Human Brain Mapping 2011, 32, 1363-1370
Hsin-Chin Chen, Jyotsna Vaid, David A. Boas, Heather Bortfeld

Abstract: Phonological density refers to the number of words that can be generated by replacing a phoneme in a target word with another phoneme in the same position. Although the precise nature of the phonological neighborhood density effect is not firmly established, many behavioral psycholinguistic studies have shown that visual recognition of individual words is influenced by the number and type of neighbors the words have. This study explored neurobehavioral correlates of phonological neighborhood density in skilled readers of English using near infrared spectroscopy. On the basis of a lexical decision task, our findings showed that words with many phonological neighbors (e.g., FRUIT) were recognized more slowly than words with few phonological neighbors (e.g., PROOF), and that words with many neighbors elicited significantly greater changes in blood oxygenation in the left than in the right hemisphere of the brain, specifically in the areas BA 22/39/40. In previous studies these brain areas have been implicated in fine-grained phonological processing in readers of English. The present findings provide the first demonstration that areas BA 22/39/40 are also sensitive to phonological density effects.

  • This paper is free to view to spectroscopyNOW registered users until the end of October 2011. After this time it will be available via Wiley's Pay-Per-View service for US$35.
  • Click here to access the abstract of this paper. From here you can progress to read the full paper.
  • Click here for more details about Human Brain Mapping 
  


 

 

 

Neurobehavioral correlates of phonological neighborhood density in skilled readers of English have been explored using near infrared spectroscopy, showing that words with many neighbors elicited significantly greater changes in blood oxygenation in the left than in the right hemisphere of the brain

Social Links

Share This Links

Bookmark and Share

Microsites

Suppliers Selection
Societies Selection

Banner Ad

Click here to see
all job opportunities

Copyright Information

Interested in separation science? Visit our sister site separationsNOW.com

Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved