Journal Highlight: MRI for differentiating primary fallopian tube carcinoma from epithelial ovarian cancer

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  • Published: Jul 20, 2015
  • Author: spectroscopyNOW
  • Channels: MRI Spectroscopy
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: MRI for differentiating primary fallopian tube carcinoma from epithelial ovarian cancer
A comparison of the MRI features of primary fallopian tube carcinoma and primary epithelial ovarian cancer has shown that the technique can differentiate between the two conditions.

MRI for differentiating primary fallopian tube carcinoma from epithelial ovarian cancer

Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 2015, 42, 42-47
Feng Hua Ma, Song Qi Cai, Jin Wei Qiang, Shu Hui Zhao, Guo Fu Zhang and Ya Min Rao

Abstract: The potential discriminatory magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of primary fallopian tube carcinoma (PFTC) and primary epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) have been compared. MRI features (the laterality, shape, size, signal intensity, enhancement of solid portion, amount of ascites, peritoneal planting, lymph nodes, or distant metastasis) of 27 tumors in 23 patients with PFTC confirmed by surgery and pathology were compared with 42 tumors in 37 patients with EOC. The mean maximum diameter was 6.1 ± 0.7 cm in PFTC versus 10.2 ± 0.6 cm in EOC. MRI features of PFTC were sausage-like shape (19/27, 70%), or irregular (8/27, 30%) shape; solid (20/27, 74%) or cystic-solid (7/27, 26%) mass; homogeneous (21/27, 78%) or heterogeneous (6/27, 22%) signal on T2-weighted images; mild (8/27, 30%), moderate (13/27, 48%), or prominent (6/27, 22%) enhancement; associated hydrosalpinx (13/27, 48%) or intrauterine fluid accumulation (7/23, 30%). Significant differences between PFTC and EOC were found in the size, shape, configuration, signal homogeneity, and enhancement pattern, associated hydrosalpinx, and intrauterine fluid accumulation (P < 0.001, < 0.001, 0.015, 0.001, < 0.001, < 0.001, and 0.001, respectively). PFTC often appears as a small-sized solid mass, with a sausage-like shape, homogeneous signal, mild or moderate enhancement, hydrosalpinx, or intrauterine fluid accumulation. Our preliminary study shows that MRI can identify the characteristic features of PFTC and differentiate PFTC from EOC.

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