Journal Highlight: Pulmonary MRI of neonates in the intensive care unit using 3D ultrashort echo time and a small footprint MRI system

Skip to Navigation

Ezine

  • Published: Mar 27, 2017
  • Author: spectroscopyNOW
  • Channels: MRI Spectroscopy
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Pulmonary MRI of neonates in the intensive care unit using 3D ultrashort echo time and a small footprint MRI system

The feasibility of pulmonary MRI of neonatal lung structures in free breathing subjects enabled by combining two novel technologies has been studied using a 3D radial ultrashort echo time pulse sequence and a unique, small-footprint 1.5T MRI scanner design.

Pulmonary MRI of neonates in the intensive care unit using 3D ultrashort echo time and a small footprint MRI system

Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 2017, 45, 463-471
Andrew D. Hahn, Nara S. Higano, Laura L. Walkup, Robert P. Thomen, Xuefeng Cao, Stephanie L. Merhar, Jean A. Tkach, Jason C. Woods and Sean B. Fain

Abstract: The feasibility of pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of neonatal lung structures enabled by combining two novel technologies has been studied: first, a 3D radial ultrashort echo time (UTE) pulse sequence capable of high spatial resolution full-chest imaging in nonsedated quiet-breathing neonates; and second, a unique, small-footprint 1.5T MRI scanner design adapted for neonatal imaging and installed within the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Ten patients underwent MRI within the NICU, in accordance with an approved Institutional Review Board protocol. Five had clinical diagnoses of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), and five had putatively normal lung function. Pulmonary imaging was performed at 1.5T using 3D radial UTE and standard 3D fast gradient recalled echo (FGRE). Diagnostic quality, presence of motion artifacts, and apparent severity of lung pathology were evaluated by two radiologists. Quantitative metrics were additionally used to evaluate lung parenchymal signal. UTE images showed significantly higher signal in lung parenchyma (P < 0.0001) and fewer apparent motion artifacts compared to FGRE (P = 0.046). Pulmonary pathology was more severe in patients diagnosed with BPD relative to controls (P = 0.001). Infants diagnosed with BPD also had significantly higher signal in lung parenchyma, measured using UTE, relative to controls (P = 0.002). These results demonstrate the technical feasibility of pulmonary MRI in free-breathing, nonsedated infants in the NICU at high, isotropic resolutions approaching that achievable with computed tomography (CT). There is potential for pulmonary MRI to play a role in improving how clinicians understand and manage care of neonatal and pediatric pulmonary diseases.

  • This paper is free to view for all users registered on spectroscopyNOW.com until the end of May 2017.
    After this time, you can purchase it using Pay-Per-View on Wiley Online Library.

Follow us on Twitter!

Social Links

Share This Links

Bookmark and Share

Microsites

Suppliers Selection
Societies Selection

Banner Ad

Click here to see
all job opportunities

Copyright Information

Interested in separation science? Visit our sister site separationsNOW.com

Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved