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Sweet, sweet: Memorable image

Date: Sep 1, 2011

Author: David Bradley

A new functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in the US shows that our memories seem to work more effectively when our brains are prepared to absorb new information.

Read More thumbnail image: Sweet sweet Memorable image

Pay up and eat up: The true cost of food

Date: Aug 1, 2011

Author: David Bradley

Ghrelin, a naturally occurring gut hormone, increases our willingness to pay for food, while simultaneously decreasing our willingness to pay for non-food items, according to researchers who have tracked behaviour linked to the hormone with functional MRI.

Read More thumbnail image: Pay up and eat up The true cost of food

Offensive scans: Impulsiveness and delinquency

Date: Jul 1, 2011

Author: David Bradley

Youthful character traits, such as impulsiveness, are often considered amusing until they lead to juvenile delinquency and youth criminality. Now, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the brains of young offenders, of both impulsive and non-impulsive character hints at activity in a particular brain structure as being associated more commonly with the negative aspects of this personality trait.

Read More thumbnail image: Offensive scans Impulsiveness and delinquency

Aerobics and the elderly: fMRI reveals benefits of staying active

Date: Jun 1, 2011

Author: David Bradley

Increased physical activity involving aerobic exercise might slow age-related decline according to a new functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation study. The study shows how the brain's motor cortex changes as we get older particularly in those people who become more sedentary as they do so. However, maintaining a physically active lifestyle can preclude the changes that lead to unnecessary decline.

Read More thumbnail image: Aerobics and the elderly fMRI reveals benefits of staying active

Zen and the art of decision making: fMRI revelations

Date: May 1, 2011

Author: David Bradley

Buddhists are different from other people, at least when they meditate on an important decision. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) shows that specific regions of the meditating brain become active when confronted with an ethical decision but that these are different from the brain regions apparently active in people of a less Zen disposition attempting to make the same decision.

Read More thumbnail image: Zen and the art of decision making fMRI revelations

Weighing up breast risk: MRI evidence and diabetes link

Date: Apr 1, 2011

Author: David Bradley

A magnetic resonance imaging study reduces the weight of earlier experiments that correlate a high breast volume with visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and a risk of type 2 diabetes.

Read More thumbnail image: Weighing up breast risk MRI evidence and diabetes link

Tracking stem cells: Nanoparticle tags for MRI

Date: Mar 1, 2011

Author: David Bradley

Stem cells labelled with hollow biocompatible cobalt-platinum (CoPt) nanoparticles remain stable for months and have a strong tendency to align with a magnetic field. The discovery allows low concentrations of the particles to be detected using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and so might provide medical researchers with the means to locate and track stem cells in the body.

Read More thumbnail image: Tracking stem cells Nanoparticle tags for MRI

What's love got to do with it: fMRI and the loving brain

Date: Feb 1, 2011

Author: David Bradley

When it's almost Valentine's Day, a researcher's mind turns to thoughts of love. A small functional magnetic resonance imaging has been used to investigate love. The study revealed brain activity in 10 women and 7 men when they looked at photos of their spouses to whom they had been married an average of 21 years. The results? Apparently, love lasts.

Read More thumbnail image: Whats love got to do with it fMRI and the loving brain

Confine and contrast: Nanoporous nests offer relaxing home for contrast agent

Date: Jan 5, 2011

Author: David Bradley

Magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents are currently designed by modifying their structural and physiochemical properties to improve relaxivity and to enhance image contrast. A new approach based on porous, disk-shaped "nests" for nanotubes could offer a way to improve contrast by increasing relaxivity through the confinement of the contrast agent within nanoporous silicon.

Read More thumbnail image: Confine and contrast Nanoporous nests offer relaxing home for contrast agent

Compressed MRI: image manipulation scans lab-on-a-chip

Date: Dec 1, 2010

Author: David Bradley

Remote instrumentation and image compression allowed US chemists to utilise NMR/MRI to image materials flowing through a "lab-on-a-chip" device and to zoom in on microscopic objects of particular interest with unprecedented spatial and time resolution.

Read More thumbnail image: Compressed MRI image manipulation scans lab-on-a-chip
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