Journal Highlight: Optical spectroscopy and multivariate analysis for biodosimetry and monitoring of radiation injury to the skin

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  • Published: Sep 10, 2012
  • Author: spectroscopyNOW
  • Channels: UV/Vis Spectroscopy
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Optical spectroscopy and multivariate analysis for biodosimetry and monitoring of radiation injury to the skin

Optical spectroscopy and multivariate analysis for biodosimetry and monitoring of radiation injury to the skin

Drug Development Research, 2012, 73, 252-273
Tatiana G. Levitskaia, Samuel A. Bryan, Jeffrey A. Creim, Terry L. Curry, Teresa Luders, Karla D. Thrall, James M. Peterson

A simple spectroscopic method, such as optical reflectance spectroscopy, has been used with multivariate data analysis for the rapid and noninvasive in vivo diagnosis and monitoring of cutaneous radiation exposure. Abstract: In the event of an intentional or accidental release of ionizing radiation in a densely populated area, timely assessment and triage of the general population for radiation exposure is critical. In particular, a significant number of victims may sustain cutaneous radiation injury, which increases mortality and worsens the overall prognosis of victims from radiation trauma. Diagnosis of cutaneous radiation injury is challenging, and established methods largely rely on visual manifestations, presence of skin contamination, and a high degree of event recall by the victim. Availability of a high-throughput noninvasive in vivo biodosimetry tool for assessing the radiation exposure of skin is of particular importance for timely diagnosis of cutaneous injury. In this report, we describe the potential of optical reflectance spectroscopy in evaluating radiation injury to skin. This approach is technically attractive because optical spectroscopy relies on well-established and routinely used instrumentation and methods for various applications, one example being pulse oximetry, which uses selected wavelengths for the quantification of blood oxygenation. Our method relies on a broad spectral region ranging from locally absorbed, shallow-penetrating ultraviolet and visible wavelengths (200–800 nm) to more deeply penetrating near-infrared light (800–2500 nm), allowing the monitoring of multiple physiological changes in skin upon irradiation. Chemometrics is a multivariate data treatment technique that allows information from entire spectral regions to be used to generate predictive regression models. Herein we demonstrate that a simple spectroscopic method, such as optical reflectance spectroscopy, in combination with multivariate data analysis, promises rapid and noninvasive in vivo diagnosis and monitoring of cutaneous radiation exposure. Moreover, our data show that this approach accurately predicts the dose and time of exposure in a rodent model.

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